• Distance 1.8km
  • Altitude max 823m
  • Altitude min 749m
  • Duration .75 hours
  • Trail type Loop
Three Stars

Three Stars

Worth Doing

The Australian Hiker Experience Rating is a measure of the overall quality of a walk. It is intended to help you decide whether to walk a trail, not to measure anything objective. Consider this our personal take on the walk.

Grade Three

Grade Three

Suitable for most ages and fitness levels. Some bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks may have short steep hill sections a rough surface and many steps. Walks up to 20km.

The Australian Hiker Difficulty Grading System is based on the australian standard for measuring trail hikes.

Parking
Toilets
Rubbish Bins
Camping Grounds
Showers

Church Rock Heritage Loop ACT (1.8 km)

Australian Capital Territory

Nearest Town

Canberra

Starting Location

Flints car park

The carpark is well sign posted and easy to get locate

The car park at Flints will easily take 20+ cars

Finish Location

Flints car park

Best Time to Travel

Year round. If you go in mid-winter try to avoid an early start if the weather is bad otherwise your views from the summit may be impacted by low cloud and fog

Church Rock Heritage Loop Trail Review

This is one of the shortest walks I have done in a while but I found myself captivated. On the day I did this walk there were plenty of kangaroos but no wildflowers. Having said that the only way to describe this walk is ‘pretty’. It just had something about it that made me dawdle at a much slower pace than I usually walk just taking in the scenic views.

The trail gets its name from large rock that is just past the high point and at about the stage you start heading back down to the start – it looks like a church steeple from a distance.

This trail is called the Church Rock Heritage Trail for a reason as it show cases the remains of an old settlement area. The remains of the old infrastructure has good interpretation signage but some of it relies on getting the brochure from the visitors centre or having a really good memory as you pass the early signage given some of the heritage features are marked only with numbered trail markers.

This carpark is excellent for families has it has a good sized car park, gas barbecue facilities with shelter, seating and a toilet block. In addition there are large grassy areas for the kids to run around and kick a ball or just look at the plentiful kangaroos.

As I mentioned at the start of this write up, this very short trail just has something about it that can only be described as pretty or scenic, and is well worth the visit.

Gas barbecues at Flints. This is a great place for a family day out

There are good toilet facilities at this site

The trail is well sign posted with good descriptions of what you are seeing at the main feature points

Marker post and plaque commemorating the old building that once stood on this spot

Like the other walks at Tidbinbilla the kangaroos are everywhere. If you are on the south side of the city and want to show overseas visitors kangaroos, then Tidbinbilla is the place to go

There is a trail map at the start of the walk that identifies the main points of interest. Have a look at this map as the some of the trail signs have numbers rather than descriptions as it relies on you getting the brochure from the visitors centre

A remnant from the past

If you look in the top left hand corner of this image you will see a rock pillar sticking through the trees. This rock was thought to look like a church steeple which is where this walk got its name

A comfortable spot at the first lookout to take a rest or just take in the view

Views from the first lookout

Just after the first lookout point, the trail crosses the road. Check for traffic before you cross

Just after you cross the trail head a short way up the management trail following the signs. You will come to a small dam just off the trail. The day I did this walk was mid-winter and the dam had a solid layer of ice on it about 8 mm thick. Having said that it was a spectacular day if a little cold. Gotta love Canberra

Cresting the main peak on the trail

The views from this main peak are very pretty and while only a short walk its well worth doing

Church rock. This large rock tor looks like a church steeple

There is a steepish set of stairs just after you go past church rock. If it wasn’t for the stairs, this trail would be classed as grade 2 rather than grade 3

Seat and view on the way down

Across the road on the way down

The parkland coming back to the trail head

Getting There

Image from Google Maps

The trip from the centre of Canberra is approximately 45 minutes and 48 km. Once you enter the nature reserve itself travel past the Dalsetta carpark and follow the signs to Flints carp park to start the walk. The car park is approximately 5 km from the visitor centre and is clearly signposted.

The Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve contains a series of walks that are closer to Canberra than those at nearby Namadgi National Park. Many of the Namadgi walks, particularly those that go into the Bimberi Wilderness Zone, are more remote requiring a higher level of skill but with it a higher degree of seclusion whereas the Tibinbilla walks are easier to access but you are unlikely to be alone on the trail.

Vehicle access into the reserve requires a permit which ranges from a single visit at $11.50 per vehicle with up to eight people or $33.00 per year. If you are a keen walker it’s worth buying the annual pass as it only takes three visits over the year to make it economical.

If you have an annual pass you can enter the park via the boom gate and scan your pass from as early 7:30am in the morning and you will need to be out by 6:00pm at the latest (8:00pm in summer). If you are buying a single entry into the park you will need to wait until the visitor centre opens at 10:00am (9:00am in the summer).

Tidbinbilla entry

Tidbinbilla Visitor Centre and boomgate

Things to Know

Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve requires a pass to enter with your car (with up to 8 passengers)

  • The annual pass is $33 and if you plan on doing at least three visits over the year is the cheapest option
  • A day pass is $11.50
  • The reserve is accessible before the visitor centre opens so long as you walk in or have an annual pass. The visitor centre sells snacks if you need

Disclaimer

This walk was undertaken by the team from Australian Hiker

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