• Weight 300 grams
  • Size 2.0m X 2.6m
  • Material Wright 15D
  •  
  • Cost $229.95

Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp (Medium)

Rating

Rating: 8 / 10
Value for Money 1.7 / 2
Durability 1.5 / 2
Versatility 1.6 / 2
Weight 1.7 / 2
Ease of Use 1.5 / 2

Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp (Medium) Review

While tarp usage by ultralight hikers on the US long trails is relatively common this is something we don’t seem to see that much in Australia. Tarp usage in this country is often limited to heavier grade tarps for car camping and that’s about it. I very rarely see other hikers using tarps while hiking and in fact over the past five years I could count the number of traps I’ve seen on one hand.

So why then would hikers use lightweight tarps? As a piece of equipment tarps are very versatile and can be used in a number of different ways:

  • A a standalone shelter to provide protection from the rain and frost. If using this as a solo hiker you will need to use trekking poles or be able to use natural tie off points such as branches. The advantage of using trekking poles is that the height can be adjusted from something fairly low set to a more traditional ‘A’ frame set up
  • As a shelter addition either seperate to your tent or bivy to cook under or store your gear
  • As a shade shelter.

From my perspective I use my tarp in very specific circumstances. Much of my hiking is done in the Australian Alps, during mid summer, and in particular the Mount Kosciuszko area which is about as treeless as you get. The UV radiation on Australia’s rooftop is punishing and greater than what is experienced at sea level. Having a bit of shade to cool down and get out of the sun is a lesson I learned the hard way. What I don’t do is use my tarp as a stand-alone shelter, I just like having protection against bugs and creepy crawlies.

The Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp (Medium) for me was the best choice being very lightweight and purpose built. It is compatible with a number of trekking pole brands as well as being that ideal size. I did look at the larger 3m x 3m version but considered the larger size to be overkill.

Probably the hardest thing about tarps, and not just this particular model, is setting them up. I found it to be a bit of a challenge when I first started using it but once I got into a routine it became second nature. There are certainly a number configurations you can play with and in the images below we have set our tarp using using four trekking poles which works well when you have two hikers but may not be an option as a solo hiker.

So while you may have never considered purchasing a tarp, if you are about to do some mid summer hiking, particularly in Australia’s Alpine region, it’s something I strongly recommend.

We Like

  • A lightweight tarp that takes up very little space in the pack
  • Tarps are very versatile and can be used in a number of different ways; to sleep under, to provide shade and to provide rain protection

We Don't Like

  • Tarps in general can be fiddly to set up particularly when there is nothing to tie off to

Best Uses

  • All types of hiking, particularly good for long distance on non technical trails

Buy One

You can purchase the Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp (Medium) from Wild Earth

Please note that our affiliations do not influence, in any way, the independence of our gear reviews

If you have worn the Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp (Medium)e or if you have questions, we’d like to hear from you. Post your comment or question below

Other Versions

  • Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp also comes in a larger 3m x 3m size
  • There is also an Escapist Shelter and Groundsheet that can be used to create shelter options

Disclaimer

This review was done with product purchased by Australian Hiker from a retail store

Sea to Summit Escapist Tarp medium set up in ‘A’ configuration using two tracking poles

Close up of eyelet with track point tip showing

Escapist Tarp set up below Ramshead Peak in the Kosciuszko National park

Escaping from the sun in the shadeless Mount Kosciuszko region

Amanda relaxing at the Walls of Jerusalem in Tasmania

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