• Pages 176
  • Language English
  • Author Matthew Higgins
  • First Published 2018
  •  
  • Cost $32.96

Bold Horizon: High-country Place, People and Story

Non-fiction Book

Bold Horizon: High-country Place, People and Story - Book Review

This book was recommended to me as a good overview of the Australian High country. At that time I didn’t realise its focus was on the Alpine region on the southern and western edge of Canberra and the adjacent NSW alps; my local haunt.

This book is presented in two distinct sections. The first is titled ‘My Place’ and relays the author’s, Matthew Higgins, association with this region that spans nearly 40 years. Higgins traces his experience in the alpine region and discusses his times in the alps as a bushwalker, cross-country skier, historian and oral-history interviewer.

The second section is titled ‘Their Place’ and is a series of biographical chapters that highlight the individuals and couples who have played key roles in the region. These people include the well known Lindsay Pryor who played a key role in Canberra’s horticultural history and who is still recognisable in the city today.

Overall this book provides a good historic overview of this part of the Australian Alps and even though I live in, and hike extensively around this area, I learnt a lot. This is not really surprising about a book published by Rosenberg Press which has a reputation for books with a historic bent.

On the downside, even though the first section of the book was clearly identified  as ‘My Place’ I found there was an over reliance on a first person narrative which is a style I don’t mind in small doses but in this case, I found it to be a bit monotonous. I  preferred the writing style in the second half of the book which moves away from the first person.

This book won’t suit everyone’s tastes but if you have a love of things historic, and in this case the Canberra region high country, then you will find this an interesting read with a lot to offer.

Chapter Headings

Part 1: My Place

  • The Brindabellas and Beyond
  • Kids at Kiandra
  • Australia’s K2
  • The Day We Didn’t Lose the Chief Justice
  • Caprice of the High Country
  • A Precious Watery Corner in a Dry Continent
  • Going it Alone
  • The High Country as a Storied Landscape
  • Chasing Mountain Memories: Interviewing About the High Country
  • From Microphones to Boots and Skis
  • Maps

Part 2: Their Place

  • Bert Bennett: The Alps from End to End
  • Stumpy Oldfield: Hard Labour
  • Helen and John Dowling: A Love Affair with Brindabella
  • Dean Freeman: Protecting Culture and Country
  • Hughie Read: Raconteur from the Naas Valley
  • Lindsey Pryor: Man of the Mountains and Man of Science
  • Louis Margules: Tough Kid from the Cotter
  • Bruce Hoad: When Caves Were a King
  • Daphne and Colin Curtis: Married to the Mountains
  • Tim Ingram: Answering the Call of the High Country
  • Elyne Mitchell: Mountain Author
  • Chapter Notes and Acknowledgements
  • Index

We Like

  • This book provides an historic overview of the Australian high country with the focus being on the broader Canberra region and nearby NSW
  • Some great personal stories

We Don't Like

  • The writing style is heavy on the first person narrative and a bit too anecdotally based for my taste

Buy One

You can purchase Bold Horizon: High-country Place, People and Story from The Book DepositoryDymocks, Amazon Australia, or Amazon USA

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Investment

$32.96 AUD

Bold Horizons front cover

Inside view showing example of a chapter start and images that are spread through the book

Disclaimer

This review was done with product purchased by Australian Hiker

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